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Ringvorlesung im Frühjahrssemester 2021

Economics, Love, and Sexuality

Im Rahmen der von der Fach­schaft VWL organisierten Ringvorlesung des Frühjahrssemesters 2021 widmen sich internationale Referenten dem Themenfeld „Economics, Love, and Sexuality“ aus unterschiedlichen, dabei stets volkswirtschaft­lich geprägten Perspektiven. Die Veranstaltungen finden zu unterschiedlichen Zeiten online statt (Vorträge, die aufgrund der Zeitverschiebung am Vormittag stattfinden, werden aufgezeichnet und im Ilias-Kurs der Fach­schaft für eine begrenzte Zeit verfügbar gemacht). Das gilt für die erste und die letzte Ringvorlesung dieses Semesters.. Nähere Informationen finden Sie weiter unten. Studierende aller Fakultäten sowie externe Gäste sind zu allen Veranstaltungen herzlich eingeladen.


(Zoom-Info für Angehörige der Universität Mannheim: Bitte melden Sie sich zuerst im Portal2 an, und klicken Sie dann auf diesen Link.)
(Zoom-Info für externe Gäste: Bitte senden Sie eine e-Mail an fach­schaftvwl googlemail.com, der Zoom-Link wird Ihnen dann per Reply zugeschickt.)


10. März 2021 um 8.30 Uhr digital live (zur Aufzeichnung s. o. den ersten Absatz):
Prof. Gigi Foster, Ph.D.(University of New South Wales, Australien):
“Are we Addicted to Love? A Parsimonious Economic Model of Love“
(Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, September 2019)


Abstract:

Love is chronically under-emphasised in economics as a core source of human motivation. As it underpins our allocation of scarce resources including effort, time, and money, love is a viable target of serious economic analysis, but economists have generally provided only shallow and reductionist models of it. In this talk, one of the world's leading experts on modelling love from an economic standpoint will walk through the rationale, approach, models, and implications of her research on love with multiple co-authors. Research drawn on in the talk will include Are we Addicted to Love? (JEBO 2019), Is It Rational to Be In Love? (Edward Elgar 2017), and An Economic Theory of Greed, Love, Groups, and Networks (Cambridge University Press 2013).


Referentin:

Gigi Foster is a Professor with the School of Economics at the University of New South Wales. Formally educated at Yale University (BA in Ethics, Politics, and Economics) and the University of Maryland (PhD in Economics), she works in diverse fields including education, social influence, time use, lab experiments, behavioural economics, and Australian policy, and publishes in both specialised and cross-disciplinary outlets. Her innovative teaching was awarded a 2017 Australian Awards for University Teaching (AAUT) Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning. Named 2019 Young Economist of the Year by the Economic Society of Australia, Professor Foster regularly serves the profession and engages heavily on economic matters with the Australian community. As one of Australia’s leading economics communicators, her regular media appearances include co-hosting The Economists, a national economics talk-radio program and podcast series, with Peter Martin AM on ABC Radio National.
  


(Zoom-Info für Angehörige der Universität Mannheim: Bitte melden Sie sich zuerst im Portal2 an, und klicken Sie dann auf diesen Link.)
(Zoom-Info für externe Gäste: Bitte senden Sie eine e-Mail an fach­schaftvwl googlemail.com, der Zoom-Link wird Ihnen dann per Reply zugeschickt.)


24. März 2021 um 19.00 Uhr digital live:
Prof. Matthew Quaife, Ph.D.(London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine):
“Sex, risk, and preferences: Using stated preference data to model behaviour in HIV prevention“


Abstract:

Pre‐exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV enables female sex workers (FSWs) to protect themselves from HIV without relying on clients using condoms. Yet, because PrEP reduces HIV risk, financial incentives to not use condoms may lead to risk compensation: reductions in condom use and/or increases in commercial sex, and may reduce the price of unprotected sex.

We integrated market forces into a dynamic HIV transmission model to assess how risk compensation could change the impact of PrEP among FSWs and clients. We parameterise how sexual behavior may change with PrEP use among FSWs using stated preference data combined with economic theory. Our projections suggest the impact of PrEP is sensitive to risk compensatory behaviors driven by changes in the economics of sex work. Condom substitution could reduce the impact of PrEP on HIV incidence by 55%, while increases in the frequency of commercial sex to co­unter decreases in the price charged for unprotected sex among PrEP users could entirely mitigate the impact of PrEP. Accounting for competition between PrEP users and nonusers exacerbates this further.

Intervention studies need to determine how HIV prevention products may change the economics of sex work and provision of unprotected sex to enable a better understanding of their impact.


Referent:

Matthew Quaife is Assistant Professor in Health Economics at London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, where he previously obtained his Ph.D. in Health Economics. He specializes in the prevention of infectious diseases, working at the interface of mathematical modelling and health economics. He faces the challenge of representing complex human behaviors in models and understanding how to encourage equitable and efficient health. His work mainly focuses on HIV and TB – two preventable and treatable diseases which remain two of the world’s biggest killers.
  


(Zoom-Info für Angehörige der Universität Mannheim: Bitte melden Sie sich zuerst im Portal2 an, und klicken Sie dann auf diesen Link.)
(Zoom-Info für externe Gäste: Bitte senden Sie eine e-Mail an fach­schaftvwl googlemail.com, der Zoom-Link wird Ihnen dann per Reply zugeschickt.)


14. April 2021 um 19.00 Uhr digital live:
Prof. Erik Plug, Ph.D.(University of Amsterdam):
“Sexual Orientation, Competitiveness, and Income“
(Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, July 2018)


Abstract:

Do gays earn less than other men because they are less competitive? Do lesbians earn more than other women because they are more competitive? To answer these questions, we conduct an experiment on a Dutch online survey panel to measure the competitive preferences of gay, lesbian and straight panel members. We find that gay men compete less than straight men, while lesbians compete as much as straight women. Linking our experimental measure of competitiveness to earnings and education data, we find that competitiveness predicts earnings and education levels and that differences in competitive preferences can partially explain the gay earnings penalty but not the lesbian premium.


Referent:

Erik Plug is Professor of Economics at the University of Amsterdam. He is the current president of the European Association of Labour Economists (EALE). Erik Plug is also research fellow at Tinbergen Institute, Uppsala Center for Labor Studies (UCLS), and past president of the European Society of Population Economics (ESPE). His main research interests center around family, education and labor economics. His work is published in among others American Economic Review, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Journal of Economic Literature, Journal of Labor Economics, Journal of Political Economy and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Erik Plug received his Ph.D in Economics from the University of Amsterdam in 1997.
  


(Zoom-Info für Angehörige der Universität Mannheim: Bitte melden Sie sich zuerst im Portal2 an, und klicken Sie dann auf diesen Link.)
(Zoom-Info für externe Gäste: Bitte senden Sie eine e-Mail an fach­schaftvwl googlemail.com, der Zoom-Link wird Ihnen dann per Reply zugeschickt.)


5. Mai 2021 um 19.00 Uhr digital live:
Prof. Cezar Santos, Ph.D.(Portugiesische Zentralbank sowie Getulio Vargas Foundation, São Paulo, Brasilien):
“Technology and the Changing Family: A Unified Model of Marriage, Divorce, Educational Attainment and Married Female Labor-Force Participation“
(American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, 2016)


Abstract:

Marriage has declined since 1960, with the drop being more significant for noncollege-educated individuals versus college-educated ones. Divorce has increased, more so for the noncollege-educated. Additionally, positive assortative mating has risen. Income inequality among households has also widened. A unified model of marriage, divorce, educational attainment, and married female labor-force participation is developed and estimated to fit the postwar US data. Two underlying driving forces are considered: technological progress in the household sector and shifts in the wage structure. The analysis emphasizes the joint role that educational attainment, married female labor-force participation, and marital structure play in determining income inequality.


Referent:

Cezar Santos is a Research Economist at the Bank of Portugal and Associate Professor of Economics at the Getulio Vargas Foundation in São Paulo, Brazil from where he also holds a M.Sc. He obtained his M.A. and his Ph.D. in Economics both at the University of Pennsylvania. Most of his published work focusses on quantitative Investigations into families and relations­hips, but his research also shows great interest in economic development and ongoing challenges for society.
  


(Zoom-Info für Angehörige der Universität Mannheim: Bitte melden Sie sich zuerst im Portal2 an, und klicken Sie dann auf diesen Link.)
(Zoom-Info für externe Gäste: Bitte senden Sie eine e-Mail an fach­schaftvwl googlemail.com, der Zoom-Link wird Ihnen dann per Reply zugeschickt.)


19. Mai 2021 um ca. 8.30 Uhr (genaue Zeit wird noch festgelegt) digital live (zur Aufzeichnung s. o. den ersten Absatz):
Prof. Soohyung Lee, Ph.D.(Seoul National University, Südkorea):
“Propose with a Rose? Signaling in Internet Dating Markets“
(Experimental Economics, 2015)


Abstract:

A growing number of papers theoretically study the effects of introducing a preference signaling mechanism. However, the empirical literature has had difficulty proving a basic tenet, namely that an agent has more success when the agent uses a signal. This paper provides evidence based on a field experiment in an online dating market. Participants are randomly endowed with two or eight “virtual roses” that a participant can use for free to signal special interest when asking for a date. Our results show that, by sending a rose, a person can substantially increase the chance of the offer being accepted, and this positive effect is neither because the rose attracts attention from recipients nor because the rose is associated with unobserved quality. Furthermore, we find evidence that roses increase the total number of dates, instead of crowding out offers without roses attached. Despite the positive effect of sending roses, a substantial fraction of participants do not fully utilize their endowment of roses and even those who exhaust their endowment on average do not properly use their roses to maximize their dating success.


Referentin:

Soohyung Lee is Associate Professor at the Seoul National University, South Korea and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor in Germany. She received her Ph.D. in Economics from Stanford University in 2008 and has been active in research ever since. Most of her published work centers around human capital and the economies of Asia, but are often also related to current topics and the ongoing challenges for different groups of society in a changing world.
  


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